Jump to content
Arquitectura.pt


Oslo | Norway's new opera house | Snoehetta


Recommended Posts

  • 3 months later...
April opening for Norway's new opera house

Photos : http://www.snoarc.no/#/projects/15/false/all/

OSLO, Feb 28 (Reuters) - After a spirited debate over yellowing marble and mounting costs, Norway is almost ready to open the Oslo opera house, a new cultural landmark whose clean, simple lines have transformed the city skyline.

Architectural and opera buffs are hailing it as one of the biggest and most important new buildings in Norway since the Nidarosdomen cathedral in Trondheim was completed around 1300.

The opera is preparing for opening night on April 12, when 1,300 guests will be treated to scenes from a variety of operas. Opera chief Bjoern Simensen said it would be Norway's "biggest social event since the Lillehammer Olympic Games in 1994."

He also promised a magnificent acoustic experience. "There was not a dry eye in the room when we had our first acoustic test," Simensen told foreign journalists on a tour on Thursday.

During construction, a heated debate sprang up when the white marble, the main material both inside and out, started turning yellow, to the despair of politicians and the public.

Many said Norwegian granite would have been better because of the cold climate, pollution from a motorway beside the building and the waterfront location.

"We are in control of this. In April, it will all be gone," said Simensen, speaking against a backdrop of builders at work and singers and ballet dancers in rehearsal.

Simon Ewings of the architecture firm Snoehetta also called it a temporary problem.

"It is not the marble itself and it will disappear as soon as it dries," he said, explaining that the discoloration was a reaction between the foundations, the marble and the humidity.

Snoehetta, which has also designed a cultural centre for the site of New York's World Trade Center skyscrapers destroyed in the Sept. 11, 2001 terror attacks, won the competition for the opera house from among 230 entries.

The cost of the building was originally estimated at 2.2 billion Norwegian crowns ($422 million) in 2002, but the budget has since doubled.

Construction costs in Norway have risen much faster than those of other industries, pushed up by an economic boom that has kept builders busy. The opera is 90 percent state-owned.

Its simplicity and clean lines make the building stand out on the Oslo skyline, the architect said. "When you have seen it once, you will remember it," Ewings said.

The flat roof -- "the building's most important piece of art", Ewings says -- is covered with 37,000 marble stones and the audience can walk around on it.

The opera has the biggest area of solar panels in Norway on one of its facades, meeting some of the building's energy needs.

in http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showthread.php?p=23130174#post23130174

FOTOGRAFIAS

Exterior

http-~~-//www.33igc.org/fileshare/Bilder/Opera%20house.jpg

http-~~-//www.nancarrow-webdesk.com/warehouse/storage2/2008-w13/img.176420_t.jpg

http-~~-//farm3.static.flickr.com/2414/2450331056_e409b4794f.jpg

Interior

http-~~-//www.notempire.com/images/uploads/opera03.jpg

Mais fotografias

VIDEOS

[ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nQktQRZETAs"]YouTube - Norwegian Opera built in 3 minutes[/ame]

[ame="
"]YouTube - The New Oslo Opera House[/ame]

[ame="
"]YouTube - The Norwegian Operahouse architectural AV show[/ame]


WIKIPEDIA

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_National_Opera_House_(Oslo)
Link to post
Share on other sites
Arquitectos: Snohetta
Localizaçã0: Bjørvika, Oslo, Noruega
Área: 38.500²
Início de construção: 2004
Conclusão: 2007
Estudos Geológicos: NGI
Engenheiro de Estruturas: Reinertsen Engineering ANS
Engenheiro Eléctrico: Ingeniør Per Rasmussen AS
Desenho do Teatro: Theatre Project Consultants
Acústica: Brekke Strand Akustikk, Arup Acoustic
Fotografias: Snohetta, Nina Reistad, Statsbygg, Erik Berg & Nicolas Buisson

Architect’s description
The operahouse is the realisation of the winning competion entry. Four diagrams, which were part of the entry, explain the building’s basic concept.

“The wave wall”
Opera and ballet are young artforms in Norway. These artforms evolve in an international setting . The Bjørvika peninsula is part of a harbour city, which is historically the meeting point with the rest of the world.. The dividing line between the ground ‘here’ and the water ‘there’is both a real and a symbolic threshold. This threshold is realised as a large wall on the line of the meeting between land and sea, Norway and the world, art and everyday life. This is the threshold where the public meet the art.

“The Factory”
A detailed brief was developed as a basis for the competition. Snøhetta proposed that the production facitities of the operahouse should be realised as a self contained, rationally planned ‘factory’. This factory should be both functional and flexible during the planning phase as well as in later use. This flexibility has proved to be very important during the planning phase: a number of rooms and romm groups have been adjusted in collaboration with the end user. These changes have improved the buildings functionality without affecting the architecture.

“The Carpet”
The competion brief stated that the operahouse should be of high architectural quality and should be monumental in it’s expression. One idea stood out as a legitimation of this monumentality: The concept of togetherness, joint ownership, easy and open access for all. To achieve a monumentality based on these notions we wished to make the opera accessible in the widest possible sense, by laying out a ‘carpet’ of horizontal and sloping surfaces on top of the building. This carpet has been given an articulated form, related to the cityscape. Monumentality is achieved through horizontal extension and not verticality.
The conceptual basis of the competition, and the final building, is a combination of these three elements - The wave wall, the factory and the carpet.

Urban situation
The operahouse is the first element in the planned transformation of this area of the city. In 2010 the heavy traffic beside the building will be moved into a tunnel under the fjord. Due to its size and aesthetic expression, the operahouse will stand apart from other buildings in the area. The marble clad roofscape forms a large public space in the landscape of the city and the fjord.
The public face of the operahouse faces west and north - while at the same time, the building’s profile is clear from a great distance from the fjord to the south. Viewed from the Akershus castle and from the grid city the building creates a relationship between the fjord and the Ekerberg hill to the east. Seen from the central station and Chr. Fredriks sq. The opera catches the attention with a falling which frames the eastern edge of the view of the fjord and its islands.

The building connects city and fjord, urbanity and landscape.
To the East, the ‘factory’ is articulated and varied.
One can see the activities within the building: Ballet reheasal rooms at the upper levels, workshops at street level. The future connection to a living and animated new part of town will give a greater sense of urbanity.










Link:
http://www.snoarc.no/

Não é incrível tudo o que pode caber dentro de um lápis?...

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 6 months later...
  • 2 months later...
Arquitectura norueguesa em destaque
Prémio Mies van der Rohe para a Ópera de Oslo, onde podemos passear pelo telhado Imagem colocada
29.04.2009 - 14h50 Alexandra Prado Coelho
É um edifício que nasce na água e sobre o qual se pode caminhar. A nova ópera de Oslo, do atelier norueguês Snohetta, quer ser um símbolo da Noruega moderna.

A Ópera de Oslo foi notícia há um ano por uma razão que a ultrapassou completamente: na inauguração, a chanceler alemã, Angela Merkel, apareceu com um enorme decote que surpreendeu todos e que a atirou para as primeiras páginas dos jornais. Agora a Ópera volta a ser notícia por razões que têm tudo a ver com ela, sobretudo com o edifício: o projecto do atelier norueguês Snohetta, recebeu ontem um dos mais prestigiados prémios de arquitectura, o Mies van der Rohe.

Há 700 anos que não se construía na Noruega um centro cultural com esta dimensão. E estamos a falar de uma área do tamanho de quatro estádios de futebol, de um interior com 1100 divisões, e de um dos mais modernos e tecnologicamente avançados palcos de ópera do mundo. O auditório principal tem 1350 lugares, e existe uma segunda sala com capacidade para 400 pessoas, além de uma sala de ensaios com 200 lugares.

Mas o que torna esta ópera excepcional é o seu telhado inclinado, que começa junto à água, na baía de Oslo, e permite que as pessoas subam por ele e passeiem sobre o edifício.

A ambição foi, desde o início, grande. Pretendeu-se criar “um importante símbolo do que a Noruega moderna representa como nação e expressar o papel que a ópera e o ballet devem ter na sociedade”, explica o Snohetta no texto em que apresenta o projecto (os três sócios do atelier, Kjetil Traedal Thorsen, Tarald Lundevall e Craig Dykers, são também os responsáveis pela nova Biblioteca de Alexandria, no Egipto).

O edifício é além disso, sublinha por seu lado o texto do prémio Mies van der Rohe, “o primeiro elemento da transformação da zona da baía de Oslo, com o objectivo de voltar a ligar a cidade à sua frente marítima”. E é “uma paisagem arquitectónica aberta ao público”.

É precisamente esse factor, essa “generosidade” do edifício, que o crítico de arquitectura Jorge Figueira destaca. “Estabelece uma relação muito física com os utilizadores. Convida as pessoas a estarem nele mesmo não estando dentro dele”. Confessa, contudo, que não o considera “uma obra surpreendente”. Sendo “sem dúvida muito qualificada, não é particularmente inovadora”, diz.

Figueira vê na ópera “uma espécie de encontro entre a excelente tradição da arquitectura nórdica, no uso dos materiais, no rigor construtivo, no tema da organicidade das formas, e o desejo muito contemporâneo de criar um ícone”. E vê na forma como esta ideia é trabalhada a influência de elementos da arquitectura modernista brasileira, nomeadamente nessas rampas que “permitem circular em cima do edifício, tornando-o também um circuito exterior”.

No interior os arquitectos usaram sobretudo madeira, invocando a tradição dos construtores de barcos noruegueses. A par disso, pediram a vários artistas (o atelier tem uma colaboração especialmente próxima com o artista dinamarquês Olafur Eliasson, com quem fez em 2007 o pavilhão da Serpentine Gallery, em Londres), para fazerem intervenções — Eliasson, por exemplo, fez um vestiário.

A Ópera de Oslo foi escolhida para o Prémio Mies van der Rohe — que tem um valor de 60 mil euros, e é apoiado pela União Europeia — de entre uma lista de cinco finalistas que incluía o Zenith Music Hall de Estrasburgo (França) do Studio Fuksas, a Universidade Luigi Bocconi de Milão (Itália) dos Grafton Architects, o Centro Multimodal do Tramway de Nice (França) do Atelier Marc Barani, e a Biblioteca, Centro para Seniores e Pátio Interior em Barcelona (Espanha) dos RCR Arquitectes.


retirado de http://ultimahora.publico.clix.pt/noticia.aspx?id=1377483
Link to post
Share on other sites

http-~~-//static.worldarchitecturenews.com/project/uploaded_files/11500_oslo%20opera2main.JPG
http-~~-//static.worldarchitecturenews.com/news_images/11500_1_Opera%20House%201big.jpg
http-~~-//static.worldarchitecturenews.com/news_images/11500_4_Opera%20House%205big.jpg
http-~~-//static.worldarchitecturenews.com/news_images/11500_5_Opera%20House%206big.jpg

Norwegian National Opera & Ballet house scoops Europe's most prestigious prize

The European Commission and the Fundació Mies van der Rohe announced today that the Norwegian National Opera & Ballet, Oslo, Norway by Snøhetta is the winner of the European Union Prize for Contemporary Architecture – Mies van der Rohe Award 2009.
The Jury also awarded the Emerging Architect Special Mention to STUDIO UP/ Lea Pelivan and Toma Plejić; for Gymnasium 46° 09' N / 16° 50' E, Koprivnica, Croatia.
The 60,000€ Prize funded with support by the European Union, is one of the most important and prestigious prizes for international architecture and is awarded biennially to built works completed within the previous two years.
The landmark building by Snøhetta, who also designed the new Library of Alexandria (2002), is the largest cultural centre built in Norway in 700 years. The first element of the regeneration of the bay area of Oslo, its sloping stone roof - made up of 36,000 fitted pieces – rises up from the fjord; allowing members of the public, residents and opera goers alike, to walk over the building, developing a relationship with the public structure. Integral to the 1,000-room interior, which is largely lined with crafted woodwork (using the traditions of Norwegian boat builders), are a number of art commissions interwoven into the structural fabric, including a cloakroom, a collaboration with their 2007 Serpentine Pavilion collaborator Olafur Eliasson.
The Jury, chaired by Francis Rambert includes: Ole Bouman, Irena Fialová, Fulvio Irace, Luis M. Mansilla, Carme Pinós and Vasa J. Perović.
Francis Rambert, Chair of the Jury said: “The Norwegian National Opera and Ballet in Oslo is more than just a building. It is first an urban space, a gift to the city. The building can be considered a catalyst of all the energies of the city and is emblematic of the regeneration of its urban tissue.”
“Snøhetta consider The Mies van der Rohe Award among the worlds most prestigious architectural acknowledgements," added Tarald Lundevall, partner and project architect for Snøhetta. "We are greatly honoured to receive this prize for The Norwegian National Opera and Ballet.”
The winner of the Prize was selected from a shortlist of five finalists selected from 340 projects proposed by the Architects’ Council of Europe (ACE) member associations, other national architectural associations, the group of Experts and the Advisory Committee. The five finalists were:
Zenith Music Hall, Strasbourg (France) by Studio Fuksas/ Massimiliano & Doriana Fuksas
Luigi Bocconi University, Milan (Italy) by Grafton Architects/ Shelley McNamara, Yvonne Farrell,
Norwegian National Opera & Ballet, Oslo (Norway) by Snøhetta/ Kjetil Trædal Thorsen, Tarald Lundevall, Craig Dykers.
Multimodal Centre – Nice Tramway, Nice (France) by Atelier Marc Barani
Library, Senior Citizens’ Centre and Interior Courtyard, Barcelona (Spain) by RCR Arquitectes
A travelling exhibition and catalogue featuring the works chosen by the Jury – the Prize Winner, Special Mention, the finalists and the shortlisted works - will be presented in September this year.

Fonte: World Architecture News
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...

Há 700 anos que não se construía na Noruega um centro cultural com esta dimensão

http://arteportodaparte.blogspot.com/2009/05/premio-mies-van-der-rohe-para-opera-de.htmlHá 12 dias |Arte Por Toda A Parte|

Prémio Mies van der Rohe para a Ópera de OsloHá 21 dias Arquitectura.pt

Arquitectura norueguesa em destaque

Prémio Mies van der Rohe para a Ópera de Oslo, onde podemos passear pelo telhado

29.04.2009 - 14h50 Alexandra Prado Coelho

É um edifício que nasce na água e sobre o qual se pode caminhar. A nova ópera de Oslo, do atelier norueguês Snohetta, quer ser um símbolo da Noruega moderna.

A Ópera de Oslo foi notícia há um ano por uma razão que a ultrapassou completamente: na inauguração, a chanceler alemã, Angela Merkel, apareceu com um enorme decote que surpreendeu todos e que a atirou para as primeiras páginas dos jornais. Agora a Ópera volta a ser notícia por razões que têm tudo a ver com ela, sobretudo com o edifício: o projecto do atelier norueguês Snohetta, recebeu ontem um dos mais prestigiados prémios de arquitectura, o Mies van der Rohe.

Há 700 anos que não se construía na Noruega um centro cultural com esta dimensão. E estamos a falar de uma área do tamanho de quatro estádios de futebol, de um interior com 1100 divisões, e de um dos mais modernos e tecnologicamente avançados palcos de ópera do mundo. O auditório principal tem 1350 lugares, e existe uma segunda sala com capacidade para 400 pessoas, além de uma sala de ensaios com 200 lugares.

Mas o que torna esta ópera excepcional é o seu telhado inclinado, que começa junto à água, na baía de Oslo, e permite que as pessoas subam por ele e passeiem sobre o edifício.

A ambição foi, desde o início, grande. Pretendeu-se criar “um importante símbolo do que a Noruega moderna representa como nação e expressar o papel que a ópera e o ballet devem ter na sociedade”, explica o Snohetta no texto em que apresenta o projecto (os três sócios do atelier, Kjetil Traedal Thorsen, Tarald Lundevall e Craig Dykers, são também os responsáveis pela nova Biblioteca de Alexandria, no Egipto).

O edifício é além disso, sublinha por seu lado o texto do prémio Mies van der Rohe, “o primeiro elemento da transformação da zona da baía de Oslo, com o objectivo de voltar a ligar a cidade à sua frente marítima”. E é “uma paisagem arquitectónica aberta ao público”.

É precisamente esse factor, essa “generosidade” do edifício, que o crítico de arquitectura Jorge Figueira destaca. “Estabelece uma relação muito física com os utilizadores. Convida as pessoas a estarem nele mesmo não estando dentro dele”. Confessa, contudo, que não o considera “uma obra surpreendente”. Sendo “sem dúvida muito qualificada, não é particularmente inovadora”, diz.

Figueira vê na ópera “uma espécie de encontro entre a excelente tradição da arquitectura nórdica, no uso dos materiais, no rigor construtivo, no tema da organicidade das formas, e o desejo muito contemporâneo de criar um ícone”. E vê na forma como esta ideia é trabalhada a influência de elementos da arquitectura modernista brasileira, nomeadamente nessas rampas que “permitem circular em cima do edifício, tornando-o também um circuito exterior”.

No interior os arquitectos usaram sobretudo madeira, invocando a tradição dos construtores de barcos noruegueses. A par disso, pediram a vários artistas (o atelier tem uma colaboração especialmente próxima com o artista dinamarquês Olafur Eliasson, com quem fez em 2007 o pavilhão da Serpentine Gallery, em Londres), para fazerem intervenções — Eliasson, por exemplo, fez um vestiário.

A Ópera de Oslo foi escolhida para o Prémio Mies van der Rohe — que tem um valor de 60 mil euros, e é apoiado pela União Europeia — de entre uma lista de cinco finalistas que incluía o Zenith Music Hall de Estrasburgo (França) do Studio Fuksas, a Universidade Luigi Bocconi de Milão (Itália) dos Grafton Architects, o Centro Multimodal do Tramway de Nice (França) do Atelier Marc Barani, e a Biblioteca, Centro para Seniores e Pátio Interior em Barcelona (Espanha) dos RCR Arquitectes.

IN http://ultimahora.publico.clix.pt/noticia.aspx?id=1377483




Ópera de Oslo ganha prémio de arquitectura

O edifício da Ópera de Oslo, na Noruega, venceu a edição de 2009 do prémio “Mies van der Rohe” de arquitectura contemporânea. Elemento central da transformação urbana da cidade, que procura o reencontro com a água, o espaço de 18 mil metros quadrados tornou-se muito rapidamente num ponto de encontro dos habitantes da cidade, uma espécie de catalizador de energias.

VIDEO - http://pt.euronews.net/2009/05/12/opera-de-oslo-ganha-premio-de-arquitectura/

IN http://pt.euronews.net/2009/05/12/opera-de-oslo-ganha-premio-de-arquitectura/

Link to post
Share on other sites

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.