Jump to content
Arquitectura.pt


ARA

Beijing | Estadio Olimpico | Jacques Herzog e Pierre de Meuron

Recommended Posts

Herzog and de Meuron's excellent adventure in China

Posted by Jeremy Goldkorn, May 21, 2006 06:03 PM

Imagem colocada
The Bird's Nest rising

The New York Times has published a lengthy feature story about new architecture in China, focusing on the trials and tribulations of Swiss architectural firm Herzog and de Meuron that designed the 'Bird's Nest', the futuristic-looking stadium that will be the main stadium for the the 2008 Olympic Games in Beijing.

NYTimes.com:

The China Syndrome
Published: May 21, 2006

"Everyone thinks this is the most remarkable piece of architecture we have ever designed," the architect Jacques Herzog told me months before in Switzerland, where he lives. "To realize that project there is amazing." It defies expectations to see this avant-garde building rising in China, and yet, Herzog had remarked, "such a structure you couldn't do anywhere else."
For architects, China is the land of dreams.
(...)
Hungry architects are drawn to China by the abundance of economic opportunities. But Herzog & de Meuron, the Swiss firm that designed the stadium, doesn't need to drum up business. It has more work than it can handle. What attracted the firm's leaders to China is an openness to audacious projects, which they attribute to the lack of timidity and inhibition in the people there. "They are so fresh in their mind," Herzog says. "They have the most radical things in their tradition, the most amazing faience and perforated jades and scholar's rocks. Everyone is encouraged to do their most stupid and extravagant designs there. They don't have as much of a barrier between good taste and bad taste, between the minimal and expressive. The Beijing stadium tells me that nothing will shock them."
(...)

Imagem colocada
The architect Pierre de Meuron at the construction site of the National Stadium for the 2008 Games.

(...)
Finding new ways to invoke an ancient tradition within a modern context is the intellectual challenge that animates the work of Herzog & de Meuron in China. There are many approaches to the problem, most of them awful. At the onset of the Beijing building boom in the late 1980's, the city's mayor preferred that skyscraper architects tip their hats to the Chinese past. All across town you can see tall buildings capped by absurdly historicist roofs in the style of the Forbidden City. "If you wanted it approved, you had to add a big roof," says Cui Kai, the chief architect of the CAG. "That's a very simple way to connect modern and traditional. Herzog & de Meuron are doing it in a much more interesting way."
(...)
"I would rather have this experience than to ask too many questions and be too careful and miss the experience," de Meuron says. "Being confronted by this culture, you mix new experiences in your own work. The ambition is to discover new ways of developing architecture."
(...)
The bulldozers began moving earth while the architects at the CAG were cranking out their preliminary drawings for approval. New drawings had to be prepared while the earlier ones were still being reviewed. "Every day, they needed drawings"
(...)
As time was running out, he waited and waited, until finally the government requested that he remove the retractable roof. The decision saved 15,000 tons of steel. Strangely enough, the desire to mask the support structure of the retractable roof had been an initial link in the chain of thinking that eventually led to the "bird's nest" design. The roof would have been an engineering triumph, but without it, the overall form became more graceful.
(...)
The office also facilitates the asking of a vital question that shadows every choice: How Chinese is it?
During his three-day visit to Beijing in March, de Meuron met with the firm's local architects. At this advanced stage of the process, the design of the steel structure and the concrete bowl was already determined. In the gap between the two, the architects have inserted a hotel, a shopping mall, a convention center and some areas intended to be open at all times to the general public. "What we think is the strength of this project is the space in between, the concourse, which is to be filled with life," de Meuron told me. "In Beijing, even in this harsh climate, the people use the public space — to dance, to play cards — unlike in Germany or Switzerland." Between the red-painted concrete and the silver-painted steel, he envisioned a continuous pageant.
Most of the unresolved issues pertained to the design of the stadium interior. The stadium architects had set up lighting prototypes and tile samples for de Meuron to examine. The most elaborate model was an undulating wall section, projecting several inches and covered loosely with red silk. It was under consideration for the V.I.P. reception room.
(...)
"And also the color," the woman said.
"Not the right red, or should not be red?" de Meuron asked her.
"In China, we don't make public areas red," she replied.
"But we made the whole stadium red"
(...)
De Meuron turned reflective. "We are Swiss," he said. "Switzerland is a very small country. The first big-scale project we did was the Tate, the Turbine Hall. For us, it was a big step. Will it function? I think it functions very well. It is not oppressive. I think the same goes for this stadium, so this huge structure is not oppressive. The way we accomplished that was with the membrane and the bird's-nest idea." He favored a similar approach for the V.I.P. welcome room. "It is a large space; it should remain large, but we don't want to be oppressive," he said. "I am not sure the walls will be that important."
He cast another fond look toward the wavy red silk model. "I think this is beautiful," he said. "Maybe we will use it somewhere else."

Links and Sources

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

[ame="

"]YouTube - Finding the Olympic stadium[/ame] Dois ocidentais aventuram-se para tentarem descobrir o estadio. Descobrem-no e conversam com os construtores do estadio. Nota-se o Estadio ao longe. [ame="
"]YouTube - China Trend: Olympic Stadium Beijing[/ame] [ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3kIvRedNsVQ"]YouTube - Olympic Stadium, Bejing China[/ame] Objectivo pelo qual passo estes videos e saber a escala dele. Ate agora posso conluir que o edificio parece mais pequeno do que tinha em mente.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

http://www.beijingupdates.com/forum/UploadFile/2007-7/200771923544784269.jpg Ja esta quase... muito sinceramente mas visto daqui parece-me inacabado. http://www.beijingupdates.com/forum/UploadFile/2007-7/2007720044141386.jpg As Piscinas Olimpicas... http://www.beijingupdates.com/forum/UploadFile/2007-7/2007720001813736.jpg Brutal. http://www.beijingupdates.com/forum/UploadFile/2007-7/2007720012074869.jpg O pormenor. Resumindo e concluindo. Fazem-se renders e fotomontagens tao boas, mas tao boas que depois de acabado ficamos ... eu fico com as expectactivas frustradas ate que aparece uns fotografos que glorificam o objecto arquitectonico e depois vamos la e ...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Um video sobre a relacao entre os Jogos Olimpicos e a Cidade de Beijing [ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jGwDz5KkfmQ"]YouTube - Beijing Olympics: How modern? How different? (Part 1 of 5)[/ame] [ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YSlbr3NimV8"]YouTube - Beijing Olympics: How modern? How different? (Part 2 of 5)[/ame] [ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nmEyIO-LKT4"]YouTube - Beijing Olympics: How modern? How different? (Part 3 of 5)[/ame] [ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=16Y-dLkpfaw"]YouTube - Beijing Olympics: How modern? How different? (Part 4 of 5)[/ame] [ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wIDrKjvc9bk"]YouTube - Beijing Olympics: How modern? How different? (Part 5 of 5)[/ame]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Muito sinceramente....eu acho tudo isto fantástico. Não passo de um simples estudante prestes a entrar no mundo com que sempre sonhei, o mundo da arquitectura, mas todas estas "impossíveis" reais obras merecem merecidíssimos aplausos. Congratulations China :clap:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bem, estes documentários apresentados pelo nosso amigo JVS são algo caricatos, como se durante o processo de construção dos projectos ainda restassem dúvidas que aquilo se aguenta em pé... Acidentes podem acontecer, mas achar que os arquitectos/engenheiros têm grandes dúvidas?... só mesmo para fazer "filme"... hehehe... As obras em si são de um iconocismo tremendo... cada uma à sua maneira, cada uma com inovações tecnológicas próprias... fantástico... :clap:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

http://bbs.cps365.com/attachments/month_0701/1_0jxjOuGXEQK4.jpg http://bbs.cps365.com/attachments/month_0701/2_3Dj7NlcJvpwm.jpg http://bbs.cps365.com/attachments/month_0701/1_Zh3Hyqnekfca.jpg O interior das Piscinas http://bbs.cps365.com/attachments/month_0701/2_7YNw49jmD6Yk.jpg Visto de cima Estao a ver aqueles pontinhos... Sao pessoas.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

http://images.beijing-2008.org/00/28/Img211992800.jpg National Indoor Stadium http://images.beijing-2008.org/01/28/Img211992801.jpg http://images.beijing-2008.org/02/28/Img211992802.jpg Renders e Desenhos http://bbs.cps365.com/attachments/month_0701/1_Z6M5jg7tSiYZ.jpg Em construcao.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

http-~~-//pic.enorth.com.cn/0/01/56/09/1560946_136542.jpg
Tianjin Olympic Center "Water drop"

http-~~-//image2.sina.com.cn/dy/c/p/2007-01-26/U1043P1T1D12148133F21DT20070126112340.jpg
As galerias de entrada.

http-~~-//image2.sina.com.cn/dy/c/p/2007-01-26/U1043P1T1D12148133F1394DT20070126112340.jpg
O Interior do Estadio

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nao sei se ja conhecem... mas ei-lo.

http-~~-//photos1.blogger.com/x/blogger2/2484/4364/400/496033/birdnest4.jpg
http-~~-//www.chinafotopress.com/waterimg/7846000/cfp388574158.jpg
http-~~-//www.chinafotopress.com/waterimg/7741000/cfp388457469.jpg
by www.chinafotopress.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Há aí algumas imagens que são verdadeiramente de tirar o fôlego... :D aquela das pessoas em cima do water cube, o interior d´O Ninho e mais algumas... a mesa posta é a cereja em cima do bolo >:(

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

O ninho está pronto

Tem o dobro do aço do que é normal e resiste a um sismo de grau 8. Os opositores falam em "propaganda", os autores dizem que não poderia ser construído em qualquer outra parte do mundo.
António Caeiro (texto) e Jorge Simão (foto)

0:00 | Sábado, 28 de Jun de 2008

O estádio Olímpico de Pequim é a obra-ícone dos jogos na capital chinesa
O "niao chao" (ninho de pássaro), como os chineses chamam ao estádio onde no dia 8 de Agosto vai decorrer a cerimónia de abertura da XXIX Olimpíada, é considerado "a jóia da nova arquitectura de Pequim". A obra - desenhada pelos arquitectos suíços Jacques Herzog e Pierre de Meuron, com a colaboração do artista plástico chinês Ai Weiwei - custou 288 milhões de euros, mas as verdadeiras jóias não têm preço (o novo terminal do aeroporto de Pequim - o maior do mundo, evidentemente -, projectado pelo britânico Norman Foster, custou oito vezes mais...).

Para o governo de um país cuja economia cresceu em média 10 por cento ao ano ao longo das últimas três décadas e cujas reservas em divisas somam cerca de 1,1 biliões de euros, as contas são outras. "Temos todos os problemas, menos um: o financeiro", disse um consultor da Comissão Organizadora dos Jogos. É a maior aposta internacional do Governo chinês e uma ocasião única para mostrar ao mundo a modernização - e o poder - da China.

Em termos de empreitada, a construção do novo estádio foi, sem dúvida, uma proeza. Os números falam por si: 7.000 trabalhadores, 41.875 toneladas de aço, 2.043 famílias desalojadas, 69 metros de altura, 91.000 lugares e, à volta do estádio, 2.742 árvores e 77.000 metros quadrados de relva. Tudo feito em apenas quatro anos e preparado para resistir a um sismo de grau 8 na escala de Richter (que vai até nove). O "ninho de pássaro" já foi também considerado a obra-prima de Herzog & de Meuron, uma dupla galardoada em 2001 com o Prémio Pritzker, o Nobel da arquitectura. "Uma estrutura destas não poderia ser feita em qualquer outra parte do mundo", reconheceu Jacques Herzog. "Os custos de construção em Pequim são um décimo do Ocidente".

Numa sondagem sobre "os novos marcos de Pequim", realizada por um jornal local, o estádio olímpico ficou em primeiro lugar, à frente do Teatro Nacional, da Torre da CCTV (Televisão Central da China) e do Centro Nacional de Natação (o também popular "cubo de gelo"), três grandes obras encomendadas também a arquitectos estrangeiros, entre os quais o autor da Casa da Música, no Porto, o holandês Rem Koolhaas.

Segundo a maioria dos comentários difundidos na Internet ou que se ouvem na rua, o "ninho de pássaro" é "absolutamente deslumbrante". Mas há também quem realce que a quantidade de aço "é o dobro da que costuma ser utilizada num estádio normal". O próprio Ai Weiwei, filho de um famoso poeta perseguido durante o regime maoista, Ai Qing, já qualificou os Jogos Olímpicos como "um espectáculo de propaganda". "O Governo quer usar estes Jogos para se celebrar a si próprio e à sua política (...) Não há nada a celebrar", disse Ai Weiwei, numa entrevista publicada em Janeiro por umarevista alemã.
A cidade olímpica, com uma área de 12 quilómetros quadrados, foi construída no norte de Pequim, entre a 4ª e a 5ª circulares. O "ninho de pássaro" fica em frente do "cubo de gelo", no prolongamento do eixo central que atravessa Pequim, uma linha secular onde se integram a mítica Porta da Paz Celestial (Tiananmen), o antigo Palácio Imperial, a colina do carvão (Jingshan) - a única colina da cidade - e a torre do Tambor (Gulou). São as mais espectaculares construções da cidade olímpica e reproduzem a clássica representação chinesa do céu (redondo) e da terra (quadrada).

Antes do "ninho de pássaro", o Estádio dos Trabalhadores, na zona oriental da cidade, entre a 2º e a 3ª circulares, era o maior de Pequim. Com o Grande Palácio do Povo e o Museu da História e da Revolução, na Praça Tiananmen, aquele austero estádio foi uma das dez grandes construções inauguradas em 1959, por ocasião do 10.º aniversário da proclamação da República Popular da China. Meio século depois, o "Gong Ti" (Estádio dos Trabalhadores) continua a ser uma referência, mas por razões que não são propriamente proletárias. A área em torno do estádio é hoje um dos centros da animação nocturna de Pequim, com alguns dos bares, discotecas e restaurantes mais sofisticados - e mais caros - da cidade.

Exclusivo Expresso/Lusa

in http://aeiou.expresso.pt/gen.pl?p=stories&op=view&fokey=ex.stories/354435

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.